My brother and I recently went out to the family farm and dug up some field tile.  These were lines that had been in the ground for many years.  We were amazed to find that the cement tile looked like they had just been installed.  We found something even more amazing as we were digging on the other end of the field.  There was a hole in the ground that looked like it had been caused by a tile washout (often when there is a large break in the tile it will wash away the dirt above it causing a small sink hole).  What puzzled us was that we did not even know there was a tile in that spot.
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As my brother ran the backhoe, I probed the ground to show him how much farther he had to dig before reaching what we thought was the tile.  As I watched for little pieces of cement that might indicate he had hit the tile, instead I saw pieces of wood.  Soon the digging revealed whole timbers.  As he maneuvered the backhoe and moved one of the timbers, we found a hollow cavity below them.
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Suddenly we had a mystery on our hands.  I do not recall any trees being buried in this area during my lifetime and in the year 1900 that area was actually the bottom of what was then called Crooked Lake.  It was not until 1915 when a floating dredge dug a ditch that the area was drained. 
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We took a flashlight and shined it into the open area below the timbers and were able to make out tree trunks, large slabs of bark and twisted branches.  It was hard to imagine that these trees had been buried for nearly a century and had only rotted as if it had been a few years.  Then we remembered that this was a low area with a typically high water table.  Was it possible that the water table had stayed as high as their three foot burying depth for much of that time period, thus keeping out the air that would allow for rot?
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What makes this story so interesting is that we expect things to rot away.  We do not expect them to stay intact.  Though the trees were largely unchanged, they had begun to rot some, and I do not expect the drain tile to last forever either.  I think of the old chicken house at the farm site.  The sill has rotted off the north wall and it is only being held up by  plywood sheeting and the roof is being propped up by old wooden fence posts. 
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I think of my own body as I age.  Some people age at a slower rate than others.  They may be more like the trees in the lake bottom than like the chicken house.  Others age quickly.  Regardless aging and death are inevitable. 
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Consider as well, so much of what you have thrown away recently because it had worn out.  Christ showed His followers that because of the decaying process and the uncertainty of being able to keep what we have in this life, we need to be focused on the next life instead.  “Lay not up for yourselves treasures upon earth, where moth and rust doth corrupt, and where thieves break through and steal: But lay up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where neither moth nor rust doth corrupt, and where thieves do not break through nor steal: For where your treasure is, there will your heart be also.” (Matthew 6:19-21)
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It is so easy to focus on the things of this life that seem so exciting now, but will soon end up in the trash heap.  Instead, let us focus on God and believe on the Lord Jesus Christ, trusting Him so that we can spend our eternity where nothing will rot away.